Ever wonder about the history of the buildings your classes were held in, where you attended club meetings, or met up with friends? Check out this campus summary for more information!

CAMPUS SUMMARY

 

Queens College is located in Flushing on a gentle hill with a commanding view of the skyline of Manhattan. The seventy-five acre campus is imbedded in a suburban setting, somewhat remote from commercial areas and only marginally well served by public transportation. It is not directly served by subway, only by bus.

The area that is currently Queens College and the neighboring John Bowne and Townsend Harris High Schools was originally home to the New York Parental School, an institution for troubled boys and truants. Queens College acquired the site in 1937 and has since developed the campus to include more than 2,000,000 GSF of construction. Six of the nine original mission-style buildings, constructed in 1908, remain and form the center of the campus.

The major building additions to the campus were, in chronological order: Remsen Hall (Sciences; 1949), Klapper Library (1951), Fitzgerald Gymnasium (1957), the Colden Center (Performing Arts; 1960), the Dining Hall (1961), Powdermaker Hall (Social Sciences; 1962), Kiely Hall (Classrooms and Administration; 1968), Razran (1970), the Student Union (1971), the New Science Building (1986), Rosenthal Library (1988), Klapper Hall expansion (Visual Arts, 1992), and the Copland Music Building (1991).

THE CAMPUS INVENTORY

Queens College is a mature campus with a sizable campus inventory, in fact, one of the largest in terms of square footage among comparable four-year institutions in New York State. The buildings can be organized into four categories based on the dates of their construction and condition:

Original Reform School Structures survive from the campus’ original use as a reform school for boys.

Post-War Expansion includes those buildings from the 1950’s and 60’s, mostly clad in white brick, that represent the first major wave of construction on campus.

Late-Century Additions were constructed after the City’s fiscal crisis of the 1970’s. Although these may need some programmatic retooling, their building systems generally remain in good condition.

Temporaries and Infills were designed to provide immediate solutions to space needs, but most were not built of materials that were intended to stand the test of time.

FORMER REFORM SCHOOL BUILDINGS

COLWIN HALL

Colwin Hall, formerly E Building, was named in 1993 to honor Laura and Arthur Colwin, two distinguished Biology professors at Queens College. It currently houses Biology laboratories and classrooms.

G BUILDING

Although almost 100 years old, G Building is home to the College’s Department of Media Studies, which occupies the entire building. It originally served as the infirmary when the campus was a reform school for truant boys. The building was renovated when it became home to the faculty offices of Media Studies in 1988.L

ALUMNI HALL ENTREPRENEURSHIP CENTER

Formerly J Building is almost 100 years old and is home to the college’s Alumni and Entrepreneurship Center. 

VIRGINIA FRESE HALL

Frese Hall (formerly B Building), one of the oldest buildings on campus, was completely renovated in 2001 for use by the Division of Student Affairs and Advisement Center.

JEFFERSON HALL

Jefferson Hall, built in 1907, was the administration building of the Parental Home for Boys. Originally called H Building, it was the first building to be renamed when Queens College was founded in 1937. The College has recently made a number of improvements to the building, including the installation of a Welcome Center on the first floor.

DELANY HALL

Delany Hall was renovated in 1991 and 2001 and is home to the College’s Search for Education, Elevation, Knowledge (SEEK) program.

POST WAR EXPANSION BUILDINGS

REMSEN HALL & ADDITION

Remsen Hall is one of the first post-war buildings to be built on campus and houses various departments in the Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. It was named for Ira Remsen, a popular Queens College professor of Chemistry. Recently, the college completed a 30,000gsf addition which houses state of the art science labs.

KLAPPER HALL

Klapper Hall, named after former College President Paul Klapper, originally served as the campus library. In 1999, after the construction of Rosenthal Library it was renovated to house a number of departments in the Arts and Humanities, principally Art and English. Klapper is also home to the campus’ principal exhibition spaces, the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and the Campus Gallery.

FITZGERALD GYMNASIUM

Fitzgerald was built in 1957 and supports both academic and recreational programs. Recent renovations have included facade stabilization and curtain wall replacement with some improvements to the building’s locker rooms, but the principal building systems remain as they were when the building opened.

COLDEN AUDITORIUM AND GOLDSTEIN THEATER

Constructed together in 1960 Colden Auditorium (top) and Goldstein Theater (bottom) are the campus’ principal venues for performances of popular music, theatrical work and large lecture presentations. They represent significant resources to the borough as well, and are frequently used for high school graduations and other community events. The grassy slope of the attractive outdoor performance space at the rear is currently being stabilized and restored. In terms of building upgrades, the buildings are largely untouched.

GERTZ SPEECH CLINIC

The Gertz Speech Clinic was built as part of the larger Colden Center complex in 1960. At the time, it consisted of a small, wedge-shaped building with an interior court open to the elements. In the early 1980’s the building was renovated for use as the Speech Clinic and the interior court was roofed over.

KING & RATHAUS HALLS

Both King and Rathaus Halls were built as part of the larger Colden Center complex in 1959. Rathaus is mostly occupied by the Department of Drama, Theatre and Dance; King is home to general academic classrooms and several departmental offices.

RAZRAN HALL

When it was built in 1970, Razran Hall was known as the “New Science Facility.” It was renamed in 1994 for Gregory Razran, professor and Chair of the Psychology Department for over 20 years.  It currently houses physics and psychology research and instructional labs, animal quarters and general academic classrooms.

KIELY HALL

Perhaps the most visible symbol of the campus in the community, Kiely Hall was built in 1968 as the administrative center. Architecturally, it is composed of two buildings: a base with a ring-shaped series of corridors above which is set a slender tower.

POWDERMAKER HALL

Hortense A. Powdermaker Hall was built in 1962 to house a number of departments from the Division of Arts and Humanities as well as a quantity of general use classrooms. The building was completely refurbished in 2002.  Powdermaker is currently home to a number of programs in the Divisions of Education and Social Sciences.

STUDENT UNION

The Student Union building was the last of the buildings to be built on campus before the City’s fiscal crisis of 1974-75 and was funded by student subscriptions. It is the only building on campus with integrated underground parking.

KISSENA HALL

Kissena Hall is an off-campus leased facility that has been used as interim swing space for a variety of departments and offices.

LATE-CENTURY ADDITIONS

ROSENTHAL LIBRARY

Rosenthal was built in 1988 to replace Klapper as the College’s central library. It is also home to the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies (GSLIS).

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Given its recent construction (1991), the School of Music Building is in good condition and will require only modest modifications over the coming years. It is home to the Aaron Copland School of Music and LeFrak Concert Hall, the College’s principal venue for concert performance.

SCIENCE BUILDING (SB)

The Science Building, programmed in 1985, was originally intended to be much larger to allow for the consolidation of several science departments.  Computer Science and Earth and Environmental Sciences are the only departments currently housed entirely within the building.

INFILL BUILDINGS

I BUILDING

At the core of I Building is an original mission-style building that has been significantly modified, most notably in 1937 when the front porch was added.  The building has become the principal site of the College’s Office of Converging Technologies (OCT).

DINING HALL AND DINING HALL ADDITION

The Dining Hall was built in 1961 and the Addition in 1971. The core of the original building is a service court and food-preparation area around which are arranged dining rooms, reception rooms and circulation corridors.

CEP 1 AND 2

Temporary Buildings (Temp) 1 and 2 were built in 1966 to fill an immediate need for departmental offices. Since that time they have been re-used to meet a variety of campus needs.

Honors Hall

Most recently, Temp 3 was refurbished to house the College’s Macaulay Honors College, which offers unique opportunities to ambitious undergraduates.

CAMPUS PLANT AND SERVICE BUILDINGS

A variety of support buildings were built to service the new campus, most clustered to the west of I Building. These were built in the late 1940’s, including the Heating Plant, L-1 and L-2.-1 and L-2.